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The 45 most popular Dog Breeds in the World

11 Feb 2020
by Dog is Awesome
The dog is considered the best friend of a man - no matter what breed of dog it is. But some breeds are particularly popular. Today, dogs are more popular than ever, and the number of breeds has increased significantly.
 
What makes dog breeds popular?
There’s no single factor that contributes to the popularity of dog breeds. And sometimes, dogs are popular despite having some drawbacks. Breeds seem to be mostly chosen for size and looks – ‘cuteness’ and ‘fierceness’ are factors for different people – with little regard to other important characteristics of the breed.
 
It’s not just about the looks!
Movies such as 1943’s "Lassie come Home" led to a 40% increase in sales of Collies while Disney’s "The Shaggy Dog" led to a hundred-fold increase in the popularity of Old English Sheepdogs.
And it’s no surprise that sales of Dalmatians rocketed after 1985’s hit movie "101 Dalmatians". But again, we see that the breeds popularized by movies are not necessarily breeds that exhibit the most valuable traits. Overall, what we see is that dog breeds who exhibit better behaviour or who are healthier overall or who live longer show no marked popularity over other breeds at all.
 
Stranger still, some of the unhealthier dog breeds are also amongst the most popular. The size of a country affects popularity too. If a dog breed is very popular in a country with a large population then that skews figures in that breed’s favour – even if the breed is relatively unknown outside that country. So, there are plenty of factors determining a breed’s popularity relative to others.
 
However, the only statistic that measures breed popularity is the number of dog registrations per breed.
 
Below are the top 45 popular dog breeds in the world, measured by registration.
 
Breed groups bring together dogs that share some similar trait or traits. The groups are mainly used for dog shows where dog breeds are sorted by category and then judged.
 
SPORTING GROUP
Bred as hunting dogs sporting breeds include pointers, setters, retrievers and spaniels. They love field activities – especially in water or in woods. Breeds in this group require daily vigorous exercise so may not be suitable as pets for average families.
 
NON-SPORTING GROUP
This group is very loosely defined and contains breeds that simply don’t fit neatly into any other. So, in this group you find the Keeshond, the Chow Chow, the Dalmatian and the French Bulldog.
 
WORKING GROUP
Big and strong these dogs were bred as guard dogs, work dogs (pulling sleds for example) and as rescue dogs – especially in water environments. Examples of dog breeds in this group include the Siberian Husky, Doberman Pinscher and Great Dane. Their size and strength make them less suitable as pets for ordinary families – they need exercise, work and proper training.
 
HERDING GROUP
Dogs in this group are instinctive herders and some, like the Corgi, will efficiently drive a whole herd of cows – many times bigger than itself – to a new field simply by barking and nipping at their heels.
 
HOUND GROUP
Dog breeds in this group are hunters. They use a powerfully developed sense of smell to trail their quarry before applying their huge stamina to run that quarry down.
 
TOY GROUP
The dogs in this group share two features: size (small or very small) and delightful looks. Don’t be fooled by these looks though – many of these breed bark ferociously and they’re as tough as leather.
 
TERRIER GROUP
Terriers have a personality all of their own: determined, energetic and generally intolerant of other dogs. They’re always up for an argument and are best owned by families able to keep up with their lively characters.
 
1. Labrador Retriever
Sporting Group
Labrador-Retriever
Temperament
A firm favourite in the UK, USA, Canada and Australia the Labrador Retriever are friendly, affectionate, good-natured dogs. They’re excellent family pets and love human company. The Retriever has an even temperament and responds enthusiastically to stroking, tummy rubs and all human attention. He’s very playful – so isn’t an ideal guard dog!
 
Training
The Labrador Retriever is one of the most intelligent dog breeds in the world. This means he learns commands quickly and so amongst the easiest of dog breeds to train.
 
Lifespan 10-14 years     Weight Male: 63–79 pounds, Female: 55–70 pounds

 

2. German Shepherd
Herding Group
German-Shepherd
 
Temperament
You’ll see this dog breed used by many police forces – and military institutions. The German Shepherd is a strong, brave and loyal breed. Added to that, he’s very intelligent, he learns quickly and is physically active. Be careful though: his owner needs to establish boundaries and ensure his German Shepherd understands who is in charge – fail to do that and he’ll assume it’s him!
 
Training
A very intelligent animal the German Shepherd will learn commands quickly making it one of the easier dog breeds to train.
 
Lifespan 9-13 years     Weight Male: 66–88 pounds, Female: 48–70 pounds
 
 
3. Poodle (all sizes)
Non-Sporting Group
Poodle
 
Temperament
Don’t be fooled by the poodle’s soft, cutesy appearance – this is a strong and energetic dog! He’s playful, loves to swim and mixes well with humans and other dogs alike.
 
Lifespan 12-15 years

 

4. Chihuahua
Toy Group

Chihuahua

Temperament
A confident, quick-tempered dog the Chihuahua will take on anyone and anything – be it a stranger coming to your house or another dog five times his size. He responds well to human affection but will nip at you if he feels teased or harassed. Because he barks at everything, he makes a great guard dog. And because he’s one of the smallest dogs around he can get plenty of play and exercise even in an apartment so he’s well suited to homes that have no garden or play space.
 
Training
Self-assured and a little on the aggressive side the Chihuahua is not easy to train. He learns more slowly than other breeds so the key here is patience.
 
Lifespan 12-20 years     Weight 3.3 – 6.5 pounds
 
 
5. Golden Retriever
Sporting Group

Golden-Retriever

Temperament
A loving, playful and outgoing dog the Golden Retriever gets along with everybody. And that includes other dogs! He has lots of patience, he’s difficult to irritate and so he’s an ideal dog if you have children. His high energy means he runs, swims and plays constantly – he loves being outdoors or going on the dog treadmill!
 
Training
Despite his playfulness the Golden Retriever is a good learner, he picks up new commands quickly making it easy to train him.
 
Lifespan 10-12 years     Weight Female: 55–70, Male: 66–75 pounds
 
 
6. Yorkshire Terrier
Toy Group

Yorkshire-Terrier

Temperament
The Yorkshire Terrier is a dog with personality! He’ll fight anyone and is scared of nothing. He’s alert, full of energy and playful. He takes well to humans – including strangers – but is wary and sometimes aggressive with other dogs.
 
Training
The Yorkshire Terrier does pick up new commands fairly easily so isn’t too difficult to train.
 
Lifespan 13-16 years     Weight 12 to 15 pounds
 
 
7. Dachshund
Hound Group

Dachshund

Temperament
The Dachshund is a hunting dog by temperament so will chase anything that runs away from him. He’s independent-minded and tends to bond more closely to an individual rather than a whole family. That said, he’s playful, will chase a ball and gets on well with children provided they don’t set out to provoke him.
 
Training
The Dachshund’s independent nature means he is less susceptible to instruction; he does learn commands but takes a little longer than other, easier dog breeds.
 
Lifespan 12-16 years     Weight 16 – 33 pounds
 
 
8. Beagle
Hound Group

Beagle

Temperament
This dog breed is led by his nose! He’ll stop anything he’s doing if he picks up an interesting scent – and he’ll wander off to explore further if he’s unleashed. Despite being a territorial dog he’s playful and sensitive and is a loving companion to his human family.
 
Training
The Beagle is one of the more difficult dog breeds to train and doesn’t pick up new commands especially quickly.
 
Lifespan 12-15 years     Weight Male: 22–24 pounds, Female: 19–22 pounds
 
 
9. Boxer
Working Group

Boxer-Dog

Temperament
The Boxer is very lively, playful and energetic! He’s an affectionate dog and enjoys the attention of his human family. They’re notorious for knocking over ornaments, plants and even small children! But he’s fearless, he’s protective of his family and will guard them fiercely.
 
Training
The Boxer is relatively easy to train – but he’s not the quickest.
 
Lifespan 10-12 years     Weight Female: 55–64 pounds, Male: 59–70 pounds
 
 
10. Miniature Schnauzer
Terrier Group

miniature-schnauzer

Temperament
With its scrappy, exuberant personality the Miniature Schnauzer will fight any dog regardless of its size. He’s got lots of heart and lots of energy. He learns quickly and loves to play – but he will react sharply if he’s provoked or teased. The Schnauzer is territorial and will bark at the slightest sign of an intruder – which makes it an ideal guard dog.
 
Training
This intelligent dog breed quickly picks up new commands - so training him is straightforward.
 
Lifespan 12-15 years     Weight Female: 10–15 pounds, Male: 11–18 pounds
 
 
11. Shih Tzu

Toy Group

Shih-Tzu

Temperament
This sociable breed is affectionate at home and very accepting of strangers. He’s ideal for apartment living too – he’s small enough to get all his exercise scampering about indoors.
 
Training
One of the more difficult breeds to train he doesn’t learn new commands particularly well.
 
Lifespan 10-16 years     Weight 4 – 7.2 pounds
 
 
12. Bulldog
Non-sporting Group

Bulldog

Temperament
The bulldog knows its own mind and makes its own decisions! He’ll obey your commands – if he wants to. This home-loving breed will happily sleep all day. He’s a good family pet though – loving and loyal.
 
Training
The bulldog is slow to pick up new commands – or, maybe, he just chooses to ignore them? You never know :)

Lifespan 8-10 years     Weight Female: 39–50 pounds, Male: 50–55 pounds

 

13. English Springer Spaniel
Sporting Group

Cocker-Spaniel

Temperament
Full of energy and vigour the English Springer Spaniel will run, jump, swim and play all day. They are very social and require constant attention. They suffer if left unattended for too long.
 
Training
Springer Spaniels are obedient and quick to learn. They are amongst the easier breeds to train.
 
Lifespan 12-15 years     Weight Female: 26–33 pounds, Male: 28–35 pounds
 
 
14. Cavalier King Charles Spaniel
Toy Group

Cavalier-king-charles

Temperament
Highly sociable this breed dotes on its human family. He is both intelligent and very playful and is accepting of strangers and other dogs.
 
Training
The King Charles Spaniel is one of the easier breeds to train.
 
Lifespan 9-14 years     Weight 13 – 18 pounds
 
 
15. French Bulldog
Non-Sporting Group

French-Bulldog

Temperament
Good-natured and loving this dog breed is especially loyal to its human master. Their personalities vary – some will bark if a stranger approaches the front door, others will not. The French Bulldog is prone to bursts of activity but will sleep or lounge most of the day – so he’s quite comfortable living in an apartment environment.
 
Training
His slightly stubborn nature makes the French Bulldog a little more difficult to train than some breeds.
 
Lifespan 10-14 years     Weight Males 20-28 pounds, females 16- 24 pounds
 
 
16. Pug
Toy Group

Pug

Temperament
Pugs are excellent companion dogs and will stick to their owner like glue. They are playful and affectionate, good with children and other dogs and do not like to be on their own. Their flat noses mean that if they over-exercise they can experience breathing difficulties so take care.
 
Training
Pugs aren’t the easiest dog breed to train.
 
Lifespan 12-15 years     Weight 14-18 Pounds
 
 
17. Rottweiler
Working Group

Rottweiler

Temperament
A strong dog with power and endurance the Rottweiler is, nevertheless, a calm breed. He’s an ideal guard dog and very protective of his family and his territory. He doesn’t play well with other dogs and takes time to warm to strangers.
 
Training
This independent -minded breed is also a highly intelligent one; Rottweilers are amongst the easiest of all breeds to train and will learn a variety of new commands quickly
 
Lifespan 8-10 years     Weight Female: 75–105 pounds, Male: 110–130 pounds
 
 
18. English Setter
Sporting Group

English-Setter

Temperament
Referred to as ‘the gentleman of the dog world’ the English setter is a calm and agreeable chap. They’re also friendly but quite boisterous when playing or working – so some care is needed when there are children about. Supervise your English Setter if he’s with other dogs.
 
Training
This intelligent and eager breed learns quickly and trains well.
 
Lifespan 10-12 years     Weight Males 65-80 pounds Females 45-75 pounds
 
 
19. Maltese
Toy Group

Maltese

Temperament
Friendly, affectionate and gentle this breed wants to be stroked and picked up all the time. They get on well with children and other dogs. That said, they are fearless so if they get into a fight you will need to step in to protect them.
 
Training
Whilst not the easiest dog breed to train the Maltese isn’t the most difficult either.
 
Lifespan 12-14 years     Weight 6-9 pounds
 
 
20. German Short-haired Pointing Dog
Sporting Group

German-Shorthaired-pointing-Dog

Temperament
A highly energetic and very intelligent dog the German Short-haired Pointing (GSP for short) is a natural hunter. He needs to hunt and if living with a non-hunting family he must be given a daily outlet for his instincts. That must include lots of exercise that involves running, jumping and swimming. The Pointing dog is good with other pets and children and protects his territory vigilantly.
 
Training
A quick learner the German Short-haired Pointing dog is very much an easy-to-train breed.
 
Lifespan 12-14 years     Weight 55-70 pounds
 
 
21. Staffordshire Bull Terrier
Terrier Group

Staffordshire Bull Terrier

Temperament
A little on the small side – although sturdy and packing a bit of weight despite that – these courageous dogs are intelligent and love to play. And they need to play daily – coop them up or restrict their movements and they can be destructive. The Staffordshire Bull Terrier is fine with children but requires supervision with other dogs.
 
Training
A little stubborn, this dog breed needs some time.
 
Lifespan 12-14 years     Weight Female: 24–33 pounds, Male: 28–37 pounds
 
 
22. Border Collie
Herding Group

Border-Collie

Temperament
Very intelligent and very active you have to keep a Border Collie mentally and physically engaged all day. A bored or unexercised Collie will become destructive – meaning he’ll chew and damage household items. Natural herders, if they don’t have an outlet for this instinct, they’ll try to find it for themselves – which means they’ll even try to herd cars, joggers and children! The reward for properly looking after this dog breed is that you have an affectionate and devoted pet.
 
Training
The Collie is intelligent and a quick learner. You cannot train his herding instinct out of him but otherwise he’s very easy to train.
 
Lifespan 10-17 years     Weight Male: 30–44 pounds, Female: 26–42 pounds
 
 
23. Shetland Sheepdog
Herding Group

Shetland-Sheepdog

Temperament
Affectionate, responsive and gentle this breed is a great family dog. Shelties, as they’re known, play well with children and are very loyal. They need constant stimulation – stroking, running, jumping and playing. Shelties will bark if a stranger approaches the house, so they have guard dog qualities too.
 
Training
Shelties are easy to train – they pick up new commands quickly and are obedient.
 
Lifespan 12-13 years     Weight 14–26 pounds
 
 
24. Doberman Pinscher
Working Group

Doberman-Pinschers

Temperament
Dobermans are a protective dog breed and will take great care of their human family and their home. They are obedient, loving and stable. They are physically and mentally active – both these traits need to be engaged every day for the Doberman to not become restless.
 
Training
The Doberman is easy to train – he’s intelligent and obedient by nature.
 
Lifespan 10-13 years     Weight Male: 88–100 pounds, Female: 70–77 pounds
 
 
25. West Highland White Terrier
Terrier Group

west-highland-white-terrier

Temperament
Like other terriers, this dog breed is energetic, stubborn, brave and feisty. They’ll fight any dog of any size and even at home their owners have to ensure this dog understands who is in charge. Being a more independent breed than others he isn’t so tactile with his human family – he’s happiest outside playing, running, chasing small animals and even swimming. He might not be ideal company for other small animals and is best suited to families with older children.
 
Training
The West Highland White Terrier has an independent mind; he will learn new commands but not quite as quickly as some of the easier to train dog breeds.
 
Lifespan 12-16 years     Weight Female: 13–15 pounds, Male: 15–22 pounds
 
 
26. Bernese Mountain Dog
Working Group

Bernese-mountain-dog

Temperament
Bernese Mountain Dogs are loyal, protective family dogs – usually especially loyal to one particular family member. They’re active so require daily exercise. They live well with children and will bark at strangers approaching the door, so they make good watchdogs too.
 
Training
Bernese Mountain Dogs are quick learners.
 
Lifespan 8-10 years     Weight Male: 83–110 pounds, Female: 79–105 pounds
 
 
27. Great Dane
Working Group

Great-Dane

Temperament
Despite his large size this somewhat fearsome-looking dog is a gentle, docile, devoted family dog. They require daily exercise although nothing too rigorous is needed – a long walk is sufficient. They’re gentle with children although their size makes them a little hazardous to younger toddlers!
 
Training
Not especially difficult to train the Great Dane.
 
Lifespan 8-10 years     Weight Female: 99–130 pounds, Male: 119–198 pounds
 
 
28. Siberian Husky
Working Group

Siberian-Husky

Temperament
The Siberian Husky is outgoing, friendly and loyal. He is well-known as a very willing, high-endurance worker. He is good with other dogs and with children, but he needs a daily outlet for all his energy.
 
Training
Responds well, learns fairly quickly.
 
Lifespan 12-15 years     Weight Female: 35–50 pounds, Male: 44–59 pounds
 
 
29. Australian Shepherd
Herding Group

Australian-Shepherd

Temperament
Very outgoing and highly intelligent this dog breed needs plenty of activity and some meaningful work in order to be happy and content with life. He’s very energetic and gets on well with children. With other dogs he may need some supervision.
 
Training
This dog breed knows its own mind; they pick up commands but do require some patience.
 
Lifespan 13-15 years     Weight Male: 55–70 pounds, Female: 35–55 pounds
 
 
30. Welsh Corgi
Herding Group

Corgi

Temperament
An alert and intelligent dog - he is also gentle and affectionate. Despite his size, he is an energetic worker and wants always to be active. He can be fine with children and other dogs, but some supervision is recommended.
 
Training
This intelligent dog breed learns quite quickly and is one of the easier breeds to train.
 
Lifespan 12-15 years     Weight Male: 22–31 pounds, Female: 22–28 pounds
 
 
31. Pomeranian
Toy Group

Pomeranian

Temperament
Very outgoing, cocky even – this bold, lively dog breed is both active and a willing lapdog. They are okay with children and other dogs, but some supervision is advisable.
 
Training
The Pomeranian responds well, learning commands quite quickly.
 
Lifespan 12-16 years     Weight 4 – 7.5 pounds
 
 
32. Havanese
Toy Group

Havanese

Temperament
This dog is happy, sociable and outgoing; they enjoy play and exercise although they have no particular exercise requirements. They’re fine with children although best supervised in the presence of other dogs.
 
Training
Havanese learn quickly and are eager to please making them quite easy to train.
 
Lifespan: 13-15 years     Weight 10-16 pounds
 
 
33. English Mastiff
Working Group

English-Mastiff

Temperament
Despite being large and heavy the English Mastiff is dignified, good-natured and docile. They are energetic but are satisfied with long walks and some play. Mastiffs are fine with children but require some supervision with other dogs.
 
Training
Mastiffs learn well and are easy to train.
 
Lifespan 6-12 years     Weight Female: 119–169 pounds, Male: 160–220 pounds
 
 
34. Vizsla
Sporting Group

Vizsla

Temperament
The Vizsla is a hunting dog, strong and energetic, who requires hard exercise on a daily basis. This affectionate dog breed is good with children although might need some supervision with other dogs.
 
Training
Very eager to please you will find the Vizsla learns new commands easily and can be trained quite quickly.
 
Lifespan 12-15 years     Weight Male: 44–64 pounds, Female: 39–55 pounds
 
 
35. Weimaraner
Sporting Group

Weimaraner

Temperament
An athletic and strong dog this breed is both energetic and a fast runner. He’s fearless so makes a good guard dog and friendly and obedient so is good with children.
 
Training
Another quick learner, the Weimaraner is naturally obedient so is easy to train.
 
Lifespan 11-14 years     Weight Female: 55–77 pounds, Male: 66–88 pounds
 
 
36. Basset Hound
Hound Group

Basset

Temperament
Very patient although sometimes stubborn; the Basset Hound is one of the less energetic breeds although he still requires daily walks in order to stay healthy. They’re good with children and other dogs.
 
Training
The Basset learns quickly and trains easily.
 
Lifespan 10-12 years     Weight Female: 44–59 pounds, Male: 50–64 pounds
 
 
37. Cane Corso italiano
Working Group

Cane-Corso-Italiano

Temperament
This large, heavy and fearsome-looking breed make ideal guard-dogs. Assertive and confident by nature Cane Corsos are actually docile and loyal animals in the home. They’re best supervised if children or other dogs are present.
 
Training
Responds well to training and picks up new commands quite quickly.
 
Lifespan 10 - 12 years     Weight Female: 88–100 pounds, Male: 100–110 pounds
 
 
38. Rhodesian Ridgeback
Hound Group

Rhodesian-Ridgeback

Temperament
Originally bred to hunt lions this large, muscular dog breed has an even temperament and is loving towards his human family. He’s athletic so needs plenty of exercise. Rhodesian Ridgebacks are good with children but require some supervision with other dogs.
 
Training
He responds well to training and learns commands quickly.
 
Lifespan 10-12 years     Weight Female: 64–75 pounds, Male: 79–90 pounds
 
 
39. Shiba Inu
Non-Sporting Group

Temperament
Active and muscular Shiba Inu are confident dogs, always alert and very active. They need long daily walks and are good with children.
 
Lifespan 12-15 years     Weight Male: 17–24 pounds, Female: 15–20 pounds
 
 
40. Bichon Frise
Non-Sporting Group

Bichon-Frise

Temperament
Cheerful, playful and with a sense of curiosity this breed gets on with everyone – adults, children, other dogs. Your Bichon Frise has a lot of energy but a regular, daily walk is enough to satisfy his exercise requirements.
 
Training
These small dogs respond well to training and will pick up new commands quickly.
 
Lifespan 12-15 years     Weight 6–11 pounds
 
 
41. Akita
Working Group

Akita

Temperament
These big, courageous dogs love their human owners and are deeply loyal. The Akita enjoys regular exercise but they’re not overly energetic. Best not left with children unsupervised – and they don’t much get along with other dogs.
 
Training
Akitas are eager to please so respond well to training and learn quickly.
 
Lifespan 10-15 years     Weight Male: 70-85 pounds (Japanese Akita), Female: 50-64 pounds (Japanese Akita)
 
 
42. Belgian Malinois
Herding Group

Malinois

Temperament
Tall and strong Belgian Malinois are hardworking, self-assured dogs who are very loyal to their human families. They’re very energetic and need lots of exercise. They get on well enough with children and other dogs, but supervision is recommended.
 
Training
The Belgian Malinois is eager to please – he picks up commands quickly so is pretty easy to train.
 
Lifespan 12-14 years     Male: 64–75 pounds, Female: 55–66 pounds
 
 
43. Soft-coated Wheaten Terrier
Terrier Group

Soft-coated-wheaten-terrier

Temperament
A friendly, cheerful dog breed, the Soft-coated Wheaten Terrier is devoted to his human family and fine with slightly older children.
 
Training
Despite some stubbornness this breed’s desire to please ensures they learn quickly and are easily trained.
 
Lifespan 12-15 Years     Weight Male: 35–39 pounds, Female: 30–35 pounds
 
 
44. Irish wolfhound
Hound Group

Irish-wolfhound

Temperament
His great size notwithstanding, the Wolfhound is known for his quiet manners and gentle nature. This alert and courageous dog would defend his family with his life and does not tend to be aggressive.
 
Training
Irish Wolfhounds are easy to train and do best with positive reinforcement, but in their first year they can be clumsy and slow to mature.
 
Lifespan 6 to 8 years     Weight 105 to 180 pounds
 
 
45. American Staffordshire Terrier
Terrier Group

American-Staffordshire-Terrier

Temperament
The American Staffy is a well-muscled strong yet agile dog. They are generally a happy and outgoing dog with a confident and stable temperament. They make a loving, affectionate and loyal family pet. A properly trained and socialized dog will make a great family companion and is very good with kids.
 
Training
While the dog breed is naturally friendly to people, they can be confrontational with other dogs when they aren't socialized. American Staffordshire Terriers are intelligent, eager to please, and generally take well to training.
 
Lifespan 10-15 years     Weight 62–88 pounds
 

Conclusion

There are many more dog breeds but these 45 represent some of the most popular in the world, as our measurement is described above (per registration). The prospect of getting a new dog is exciting but the commitment is a lifetime one. If you’re thinking about getting a dog, you should consider all these points before you do:
 
  1. Is your home safe and secure; will it provide the space and facilities (sleeping area…) for your new family member? Are you ready to invest in an invisible dog fence to protect your dog?
  2. Does everybody in your home want a dog? Will they share some of the exercising and grooming tasks – especially if you’re away or become ill? Your dog wants to be welcomed by all and not ignored by individuals.
  3. Do you know how much time will be required to exercise and groom your new dog? Can you estimate it in hours per day? Do you have that time – every day, 7 days per week?
  4. You’re legally responsible for anything your dog does: will you spend the time necessary for his training and socialization?
  5. Dogs can be expensive! Can you afford not only his daily dog foodbills but grooming costs, vet bills and the regular vaccinations and worming that will keep him happy? And what about when you go away on holiday?
Look at the size of the breed you’re considering; look at its temperament, its exercise requirements, its ability to get on with children and other dogs. All these factors matter. Don’t buy a breed simply because it looks good! On the other hand, maybe you consider adopting a dog from a shelter rather than buying from a breeder.
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